Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Being the Bill of Rights

published on: 7/16/2007

Contributing Teacher(s): Shannon Savvenas

Subject Area: Social Studies/Government/Civics

Grade Range: Upper Elementary (4-5)

Materials Needed:

  • SMARTboard with Internet Access (optional)
  • PowerPoint Presentation of "The Bill of Rights" (attached)
  • Amendment document (attached)
  • Ben''s Guide Website 
  • paper
  • markers
  • one baseball cap
  • 27 paper cut-outs of various coins
  • sharpie markers
  • microphone (doesn''t have to work)
  • clipboard
  • newspaper
  • a Cross necklace (or some prop to represent religion)
  • copy or class set of "If You Were There When They Signed the Constitution"

Objective:

  • Students will be able to recongnize and understand the basic foundation of the Constitution.
  • Students will be introduced to and understand the history behind The Constitution of the United States.
  • Students will be able to use Mind Maps to record, remember, and retell the main idea of The U.S. Constitution.
  • Students will recognize the Preamble, Articles, and Amendments to The Constitution.
  • Students will apply the basic principals of the amendments to their own lives.
  • Instructional Strategy: Provide visual tools

    Process Standards:

    • Goal 4.2 understand and apply the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in Missouri and the United States

    Content Standards:

    • Social Studies 1. Principles expressed in the documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States

      Time Allowance: Two 45 minute sessions

      Description: Make the Constitution easy to understand by teaching it with the "Brain in Mind!" Students use Mind Maps and Teacher creates Brain Pictures to ensure understanding and aid memory of a not-so-easy-to-grasp concept.


      Classroom Component:

      Please click here for the Powerpoint presentation

      http://bensguide.gpo.gov/9-12/documents/constitution/amend.html

      Teaching the Constitution With the Brain in Mind: Before the lesson: Read aloud or class literature set: "If You Were There When They Signed the Constitution" to build background knowledge of the Constitution and Founding Fathers.

    • Have class sit up front on the carpet, facing an empty chair.
    • Ask for a Volunteer who is "Living" and who is "Strong." (This person will represent the Constitution!) Explain to the class that the Constitution is a "Living" Document because it can still be changed (or amended) and that it is a "Strong" Document because it was written in 1787 and is still used today. (This is a great time to have students figure elapsed time, and decide exactly how old the Constitution is.)
    • On SMARTboard Read Document "Ben''s Guide to Amendments" . There are links to allow students to see the 3 basic parts of the Constitution: The Preamble, the Articles, and the Amendments.
    • Have students read aloud Preamble together. Discuss that the prefix "Pre-" means before, and so the Preamble comes before the Constitution. Discuss with students the purpose of the Preamble (it tells why the Constitution was written.)
    • Discuss with students that after the Preamble, there are 7 Articles that explain the basic rules and principals of our country. Discuss the fact that even though they were written over 200 years ago, our Judicial Branch of Government is able to interpret and put these laws and rules to use today.
    • Discuss with class that the Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution realizing that the world was always changing and they wrote the document in such a way that would allow us to make changes following a certain process.
    • On the SMARTboard, use "Powerpoint of the Amendments" to help explain the "Bill of Rights" (the First 10 Amendments) as you present Brain Pictures to the class. Allow students to hold a clipboard with plain white paper, pencils, markers, etc. to make a mind map as you present the lesson. (For a Mind Map, students will create their own web, chart, diagram, etc. with symbols to represent the key ideas of the lesson. They may choose to draw, write whatever makes sense to them and will help them remember the content.) (Mind Maps may be modeled ahead of time to ensure understanding of your expectations.)
    • Use your volunteer (The Constitution) to sit in the empty chair up front. Explain to class that this person is representing the Constitution: Check the students pulse and explain to the class that the Constitution is "Living" and have them re-tell you why. Stand behind the volunteer and hold both of their arms up in a muscle-making position. Explain to the class again that it is a "Strong" document and ask them to retell you why.
    • Put a baseball cap on the head of your volunteer. (As students to identify the "bill" of the hat.--I used a cheap hat and wrote the word "Rights" on the bill of the hat as I spoke.) Using slides from the Powerpoint as you present, explain to the students that the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution are called the "Bill of Rights." Explain to the students that another word for Amend is "Change" and hold up a stack of paper coins (also called change!) (These will be the brain pictures to represent each Amendment.)
    • For Amendment 1: Write a number 1 on the "change" or coin and tape it to the "bill" of the hat. Explain to the students that Amendment 1 protects their rights as United States citizens.
    • Keep pointing out and reminding the students as you add new ideas (props) to your volunteer of the previous ideas you have discussed. While your volunteer is still breathing (living) and holding up one muscle (strong) hand your volunteer a microphone. Explain to the class that Amend. 1 gives citizens the Freedom of Speech and discuss.
    • (You will keep adding props to your volunteer without taking away the previous ones, they will eventually be very busy!) Next, have them hold a newspaper and explain the Freedom of the Press.
    • Discuss with the class that they are sitting together in a small group and this is called an assembly. Discuss with them the Freedom of Assembly.
    • Pass around a clipboard and allow students to add their signatures to a paper while you are explaining to the class reasons for a petition. When finished, have your Constitution volunteer hold the clipboard with the Petition and explain the Freedom of Petition.
    • Tie a cross symbol (or religious prop of choice) around the volunteers neck. Discuss with students the Freedom of Religion.
    • Review with class all of the props (brain pictures) that the volunteer is holding and that they are all part of Amendment (change) One of the Constitution.
    • Using the Powerpoint, read together, add coins (change-amendments) to the bill of the volunteers hat while you discuss the rest of the first ten amendments. At this time, students should be creating mind maps to help them remember each of the first 10 amendments.
    • After the lesson:

      1. Partner students up. Using their Mind Maps, have them re-tell the meaning and purpose of the First 10 Amendments (Bill of Rights.)

      2. Have students use their Mind Maps to fill out The Amendment document. They will have to identify the Amendment, tell what each amendment means in their own words, and apply this information to how this amendment could affect his/her life.

      For Special Needs students, have them work with a partner on document, and may need some prompting to retell using their mind maps. For Scoring Purposes: Teacher moves around room and observes/interacts as students retell Bill of Rights using their Mind Maps. For the Amendment Document, each part of the grid is worth 1 pt. for a total of 30 pts. 1 pt. for each for stating the Amendment, 1pt. each for retelling the Amendment in his/her own words, and 1 pt. each for applying the Amendment to his/her own life.

       

      Amendment #

      What it says:

      What the Amendment Means

      in My Own Words

      An example of how this amendment affects me:

      Amendment __:

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Please click here for the Powerpoint presentation

      http://bensguide.gpo.gov/9-12/documents/constitution/amend.html


      Teaching the Constitution With the Brain in Mind: Before the lesson: Read aloud or class literature set: "If You Were There When They Signed the Constitution" to build background knowledge of the Constitution and Founding Fathers.

      1. Have class sit up front on the carpet, facing an empty chair.
      2. Ask for a Volunteer who is "Living" and who is "Strong." (This person will represent the Constitution!) Explain to the class that the Constitution is a "Living" Document because it can still be changed (or amended) and that it is a "Strong" Document because it was written in 1787 and is still used today. (This is a great time to have students figure elapsed time, and decide exactly how old the Constitution is.)
      3. On SMARTboard Read Document "Ben's Guide to Amendments" . There are links to allow students to see the 3 basic parts of the Constitution: The Preamble, the Articles, and the Amendments.
      4. Have students read aloud Preamble together. Discuss that the prefix "Pre-" means before, and so the Preamble comes before the Constitution. Discuss with students the purpose of the Preamble (it tells why the Constitution was written.)
      5. Discuss with students that after the Preamble, there are 7 Articles that explain the basic rules and principals of our country. Discuss the fact that even though they were written over 200 years ago, our Judicial Branch of Government is able to interpret and put these laws and rules to use today.
      6. Discuss with class that the Founding Fathers wrote the Constitution realizing that the world was always changing and they wrote the document in such a way that would allow us to make changes following a certain process.
      7. On the SMARTboard, use "Powerpoint of the Amendments" to help explain the "Bill of Rights" (the First 10 Amendments) as you present Brain Pictures to the class. Allow students to hold a clipboard with plain white paper, pencils, markers, etc. to make a mind map as you present the lesson. (For a Mind Map, students will create their own web, chart, diagram, etc. with symbols to represent the key ideas of the lesson. They may choose to draw, write whatever makes sense to them and will help them remember the content.) (Mind Maps may be modeled ahead of time to ensure understanding of your expectations.)
      8. Use your volunteer (The Constitution) to sit in the empty chair up front. Explain to class that this person is representing the Constitution: Check the students pulse and explain to the class that the Constitution is "Living" and have them re-tell you why. Stand behind the volunteer and hold both of their arms up in a muscle-making position. Explain to the class again that it is a "Strong" document and ask them to retell you why.
      9. Put a baseball cap on the head of your volunteer. (As students to identify the "bill" of the hat.--I used a cheap hat and wrote the word "Rights" on the bill of the hat as I spoke.) Using slides from the Powerpoint as you present, explain to the students that the first 10 Amendments to the Constitution are called the "Bill of Rights." Explain to the students that another word for Amend is "Change" and hold up a stack of paper coins (also called change!) (These will be the brain pictures to represent each Amendment.)
      10. For Amendment 1: Write a number 1 on the "change" or coin and tape it to the "bill" of the hat. Explain to the students that Amendment 1 protects their rights as United States citizens.
      11. Keep pointing out and reminding the students as you add new ideas (props) to your volunteer of the previous ideas you have discussed. While your volunteer is still breathing (living) and holding up one muscle (strong) hand your volunteer a microphone. Explain to the class that Amend. 1 gives citizens the Freedom of Speech and discuss.
      12. (You will keep adding props to your volunteer without taking away the previous ones, they will eventually be very busy!) Next, have them hold a newspaper and explain the Freedom of the Press.
      13. Discuss with the class that they are sitting together in a small group and this is called an assembly. Discuss with them the Freedom of Assembly.
      14. Pass around a clipboard and allow students to add their signatures to a paper while you are explaining to the class reasons for a petition. When finished, have your Constitution volunteer hold the clipboard with the Petition and explain the Freedom of Petition.
      15. Tie a cross symbol (or religious prop of choice) around the volunteers neck. Discuss with students the Freedom of Religion.
      16. Review with class all of the props (brain pictures) that the volunteer is holding and that they are all part of Amendment (change) One of the Constitution.
      17. Using the Powerpoint, read together, add coins (change-amendments) to the bill of the volunteers hat while you discuss the rest of the first ten amendments. At this time, students should be creating mind maps to help them remember each of the first 10 amendments.

      After the lesson:

      1. Partner students up. Using their Mind Maps, have them re-tell the meaning and purpose of the First 10 Amendments (Bill of Rights.)

      2. Have students use their Mind Maps to fill out The Amendment document. They will have to identify the Amendment, tell what each amendment means in their own words, and apply this information to how this amendment could affect his/her life.

      For Special Needs students, have them work with a partner on document, and may need some prompting to retell using their mind maps. For Scoring Purposes: Teacher moves around room and observes/interacts as students retell Bill of Rights using their Mind Maps. For the Amendment Document, each part of the grid is worth 1 pt. for a total of 30 pts. 1 pt. for each for stating the Amendment, 1pt. each for retelling the Amendment in his/her own words, and 1 pt. each for applying the Amendment to his/her own life.

       


      Amendment #

      What it says:

      What the Amendment Means

      in My Own Words

      An example of how this amendment affects me:

      Amendment __:

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      For additional information contact :
      Shannon Savvenas
      Espy Elem.
      Nixa R-II
      (417) 725-7440
      EMAIL:
      ssavvenas@mail.nixa.k12.mo.us

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