Friday, October 24, 2014

Trans Saharan Trading Routes

published on: 7/31/2007

Contributing Teacher(s): Kalen Prothero

Subject Area: Social Studies/Geography

Grade Range: Middle Grades (6-8)

Materials Needed:

  • access to the internet
  • large sheets of paper or poster board rulers
  • pencils
  • colors
  • construction paper
  • sissors
  • glue

Objective:

  • Identify the importance of the Trans Saharan Trade Route.
  • Locate the region of Northwest Africa on a map.
  • Identify the major items of trade in the Trans Saharan Trade Route.
  • Identify why Islam is a major religion in North Africa today.
  • Identify the problems faced during travel on the Trans Saharan Caravan.
  • Instructional Strategy: Cooperative Learning

    Process Standards:

    • Goal 1.4 use technological tools and other resources to locate, select and organize information
    • Goal 1.8 organize data, information and ideas into useful forms (including charts, graphs, outlines)
    • Goal 4.6 identify tasks that require a coordinated effort and work with others to complete those tasks

    Content Standards:

    • Social Studies 5. The major elements of geographical study and analysis (such as location, place, movement,...
    • Social Studies 7. The use of tools of social science inquiry (such as surveys, statistics, maps, documents)

      Time Allowance: 120 minutes

      Description: This performance event activity is a cooperative learning lesson were students work in teams to create a map of Northwest Africa and the Trans Saharan Trade Routes, demonstrating their knowledge of the area and times.


      Classroom Component:

      In the following lesson, students will:

      • read a hand out about the Trans Saharan Trade Routes
      • conduct further research on the Internet
      • answer questions in small groups or as a class
      • create maps of the Trading Routes with small groups

      You will need to provide students with access to the Internet. If this is not possible you may wish to print a copy of the Trans Saharan Map and copy it for the class. You can answer all discussion questions with the student handout and map. Web sites:

    • www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm (research and MAP)
    • http://library.thinkquest.org/13406/sh/ (research site)
    • www.history.com/classroom/unesco/timbuktu/vocabulary.html (vocabulary list for Trans Saharan Trade)
    • Accomodations: There are several options to accomodate special need students.

    • Provide maps of the Trans Saharan Trade Routes.
    • Pair groups up, dividing special need students into various groups of different skill levels.
    • If keeping special need students in a group together, provide those students with aditional support, such as an aid and give them fewer requirements.
    • Provide special need students with more time.
    • Student Handouts:

      Trans Saharan Trade in Africa

      The Trans Saharan trade caravan refers to the early trading of salt, gold, ivory and slaves in North and West Africa. In early times, Arabs and other early groups crossed the dangerous Sahara desert on camel caravans in search for salt and gold, items very valuable at the time.

      Crossing the Sahara Desert was a dangerous event that many men did not survive. The availability of water was the most difficult obstacles to overcome. The use of camels made the trip easier. Sandstorms and intense heat also made travel deadly to some.

      Trade has played a major role in the economy of north and West Africa since the early times. Early camel caravans carried salt from the mines of the Saharan desert to trading centers along the Niger River. (present day Mali) Their mission was to exchange the salt for gold that was mined in the forests near the Niger River. This area was ruled by the Ghana Empire and became very wealthy because it controlled the trade routes in this region.

      The Islamic religion spread across North Africa in the 7th century because of the increased Trans Saharan trade market. Trading stops became major centers of commerce, welcoming merchants from distant lands. Some of these important trading stops included: Tahaza, Timbuktu, and Gao.

      Timbuktu was an economic and cultural capital of the world. Beginning in the thirteenth century, Timbuktu became the center of a thriving trade in Africa. Timbuktu was founded around 1100 as a camp for its proximity to the Niger River. Caravans quickly began to haul salt from mines in the Sahara Desert to trade for gold and slaves brought along the Niger River from the south. By 1330, Timbuktu was part of the powerful Mali Empire.

      Trans Saharan Trade: Discussion Questions:

    • What were the major items of trade along the Trans Saharan Trading Route?
    • Where were the major trade routes in this region?
    • What is Islam and why did it spread across Africa?
    • Why was Timbuktu such an important stop on the trade route?
    • What obstacles made travel during this time dangerous?
    • What groups of people traveled along the Trans Saharan Routes?
    • What animal made travel easier?
    • Activity: Creating a Map of the Trans Saharan Trading Routes.

      Use large sheets of paper or poster board provided to construct your maps. In addition to the information in the handout, you will also need to visit the following web sites to find maps of the Trans Saharan Trade routes. Web site for map: www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm Don''t forget your text books! See the attached guide for scoring information.

      In your assigned group, create a map of Northwest Africa. On the map, show the following items:

    • Nile River
    • Niger River
    • Trans Saharan Trade Routes
    • Major trading stops: Must have Timbuktu and at least two other cities such as:Taghaza, Gao, Tegdaoust, Koumbi Saleh, Jenne
    • Sahara Desert
    • Mediterranean Sea
    • Atlantic Ocean
    • Map key showing the locations of salt and gold mines.
    • Show difficulties that people traveling may have faced. (2)
    • Show present-day countries of the region.
    • Make the map neat, colorful, and creative!
    • Scoring guide: Circle total points for each category

      Nile River           1 0
      Niger River           1 0
      Sahara Desert           1 0
      Mediterrranean Sea           1 0
      Atlantic Ocean           1 0
      Trans Saharan Trade Routes (5 pts- all routes shown and accurate, 3 pts- some routes shown, some incorrect placing of routes, 0- no routes shown)   5   3     0
      Timbuktu           1 0
      Two other important trade cities         2 1 0
      Gold and Salt mines         2 1 0
      Map key         2 1 0
      Difficulties         2 1 0
      Present day countries (6 countries, one point each) 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
      Neat, colorful, and creative (5 pts- excellent use of color, very neat and creative, 4 pts- good use of color, neat and creative, 3 pts- some color used, neatness could use improvement, 2 pts- little color, messy, 1 pt- no color, very messy, 0 pts- no color, very messy, hard to read)   5 4 3 2 1 0
      Total: 30 possible

      In the following lesson, students will:

      • read a hand out about the Trans Saharan Trade Routes
      • conduct further research on the Internet
      • answer questions in small groups or as a class
      • create maps of the Trading Routes with small groups

      You will need to provide students with access to the Internet. If this is not possible you may wish to print a copy of the Trans Saharan Map and copy it for the class. You can answer all discussion questions with the student handout and map.

      Web sites:

      1. www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm (research and MAP)
      2. http://library.thinkquest.org/13406/sh/ (research site)
      3. www.history.com/classroom/unesco/timbuktu/vocabulary.html (vocabulary list for Trans Saharan Trade)

      Accomodations: There are several options to accomodate special need students.

      1. Provide maps of the Trans Saharan Trade Routes.
      2. Pair groups up, dividing special need students into various groups of different skill levels.
      3. If keeping special need students in a group together, provide those students with aditional support, such as an aid and give them fewer requirements.
      4. Provide special need students with more time.

      Student Handouts:

      Trans Saharan Trade in Africa

      The Trans Saharan trade caravan refers to the early trading of salt, gold, ivory and slaves in North and West Africa. In early times, Arabs and other early groups crossed the dangerous Sahara desert on camel caravans in search for salt and gold, items very valuable at the time.

      Crossing the Sahara Desert was a dangerous event that many men did not survive. The availability of water was the most difficult obstacles to overcome. The use of camels made the trip easier. Sandstorms and intense heat also made travel deadly to some.

      Trade has played a major role in the economy of north and West Africa since the early times. Early camel caravans carried salt from the mines of the Saharan desert to trading centers along the Niger River. (present day Mali) Their mission was to exchange the salt for gold that was mined in the forests near the Niger River. This area was ruled by the Ghana Empire and became very wealthy because it controlled the trade routes in this region.

      The Islamic religion spread across North Africa in the 7th century because of the increased Trans Saharan trade market. Trading stops became major centers of commerce, welcoming merchants from distant lands. Some of these important trading stops included: Tahaza, Timbuktu, and Gao.

      Timbuktu was an economic and cultural capital of the world. Beginning in the thirteenth century, Timbuktu became the center of a thriving trade in Africa. Timbuktu was founded around 1100 as a camp for its proximity to the Niger River. Caravans quickly began to haul salt from mines in the Sahara Desert to trade for gold and slaves brought along the Niger River from the south. By 1330, Timbuktu was part of the powerful Mali Empire.


      Trans Saharan Trade: Discussion Questions:

      1. What were the major items of trade along the Trans Saharan Trading Route?
      2. Where were the major trade routes in this region?
      3. What is Islam and why did it spread across Africa?
      4. Why was Timbuktu such an important stop on the trade route?
      5. What obstacles made travel during this time dangerous?
      6. What groups of people traveled along the Trans Saharan Routes?
      7. What animal made travel easier?

      Activity: Creating a Map of the Trans Saharan Trading Routes.

      Use large sheets of paper or poster board provided to construct your maps. In addition to the information in the handout, you will also need to visit the following web sites to find maps of the Trans Saharan Trade routes. Web site for map: www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm Don't forget your text books! See the attached guide for scoring information.

      In your assigned group, create a map of Northwest Africa. On the map, show the following items:

      1. Nile River
      2. Niger River
      3. Trans Saharan Trade Routes
      4. Major trading stops: Must have Timbuktu and at least two other cities such as:Taghaza, Gao, Tegdaoust, Koumbi Saleh, Jenne
      5. Sahara Desert
      6. Mediterranean Sea
      7. Atlantic Ocean
      8. Map key showing the locations of salt and gold mines.
      9. Show difficulties that people traveling may have faced. (2)
      10. Show present-day countries of the region.
      11. Make the map neat, colorful, and creative!

      Scoring guide: Circle total points for each category

      Nile River
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Niger River
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Sahara Desert
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Mediterrranean Sea
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Atlantic Ocean
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Trans Saharan Trade Routes (5 pts- all routes shown and accurate, 3 pts- some routes shown, some incorrect placing of routes, 0- no routes shown)
       
      5
       
      3
       
       
      0
      Timbuktu
       
       
       
       
       
      1
      0
      Two other important

      For additional information contact :
      Kalen Prothero
      Hamilton Middle
      Hamilton R-II
      (816) 583-2173

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      Thank you!


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