Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Tallying with Edith Ellen Eddy

published on: 8/13/2007

Contributing Teacher(s): Julee Granger

Subject Area: Math/Number Sense- Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide, Estimate, Algebra

Grade Range: Early Childhood - Kindergarten

Materials Needed:

  • The book, Edith Ellen Eddy, by Julee Ann Granger
  • The poem, The Itsy Bitsy Spider
  • construction paper
  • scratch paper

Objective: After reading the book Edith Ellen Eddy, the teacher will help students count and recognize tally marks.

Instructional Strategy: Evaluating Student Understanding

Content Standards:

  • Mathematics 1. Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division; other number sense, including numeration and esti...

    Time Allowance: 1 hour

    Description: After reading the book Edith Ellen Eddy, the teacher will help students count and recognize tally marks.


    Classroom Component:

    Motivation: Read the book, Edith Ellen Eddy.

    Say, “We are going to play a game called Counting Critters. Edith Ellen loves critters. What is a critter? Edith had two critters that she kept in a cage, but had to set free. What were they? (spiders, Legs and Joe) Do you know the poem, The Itsy Bitsy Spider? I’ll say the poem and do the motions. If you know it, do it with me.” (repeat)

    Say, “Today we are going to use this book to be spider spies. We will look at each page. If you spy a spider raise your hand. I’ll ask someone to point to that spider. Then I’ll make a tally mark on the board for each spider we find. (demonstrate a tally mark on the board) When we finish, we will know how many spiders are in this book.

    Input: When the fifth spider is discovered, stop and say, “I think I’m getting too many tally marks in a row. They will be hard to count. How can I make the marks easier to count? (dignify all student answers) Other people have found it hard to count lines and lines of tally marks too. This is what they came up with, and we will use this idea in class. (demonstrate a set with the fifth mark crossed over)

    “How many marks do we put down before we cross? How many in all? Now if we have lots of tally marks, we can count most of them by 5s” (Continue the game throughout the book. When finished, count the tally marks by 5s)

    “We have 2 left over. How shall we count them? (dignify answers) Let’s recount the groups – 5, 10, 15 – one more than 15 is 16 and one more than 16 is 17. So we have 17 tally marks, one for each spider. Tally marks make it easier to keep track when you count.”

    Closure: “You have been great spider spies today. You found 17 spiders.”

    Guided Practice: Pass out a piece of scratch paper to each student. Ask, “How do I make a tally mark? (demonstrate) Now make one on your paper.” Put four dots on the board. Say, “Make a tally mark for each dot (demonstrate). Add one more dot. Say, "Where will you put the next tally mark? Make the next tally mark on your paper while I make one on the board."

    Evaluation: Put a set of tally marks on the board. Ask the students what they are called. Ask the students to make a tally mark in the air.

    Extension: Create a Center Materials: Laminated construction paper strips with varying quantities of dots, Dry erase pens Procedure: Put sets of dots on construction paper and laminate. Ask students to make corresponding tally marks on the strips by varying the quantity of dots.

    Follow-Up Graphing with Edith Ellen Eddy lesson plan

    Math - Problem Solving : Tallying with Edith Ellen Eddy

    Teacher Name: ____________________________________

    Student Name:     ________________________________________

    CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
    Mathematical Concepts Explanation shows complete understanding of the mathematical concepts used to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows substantial understanding of the mathematical concepts used to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows some understanding of the mathematical concepts needed to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows very limited understanding of the underlying concepts needed to solve the problem(s) OR is not written.
    Working with Others Student was an engaged partner, listening to suggestions of others and working cooperatively throughout lesson. Student was an engaged partner but had trouble listening to others and/or working cooperatively. Student cooperated with others, but needed prompting to stay on-task. Student did not work effectively with others.

    Motivation:

    Read the book, Edith Ellen Eddy.

    Say, “We are going to play a game called Counting Critters. Edith Ellen loves critters. What is a critter? Edith had two critters that she kept in a cage, but had to set free. What were they? (spiders, Legs and Joe) Do you know the poem, The Itsy Bitsy Spider? I’ll say the poem and do the motions. If you know it, do it with me.” (repeat)

    Say, “Today we are going to use this book to be spider spies. We will look at each page. If you spy a spider raise your hand. I’ll ask someone to point to that spider. Then I’ll make a tally mark on the board for each spider we find. (demonstrate a tally mark on the board) When we finish, we will know how many spiders are in this book.

    Input:

    When the fifth spider is discovered, stop and say, “I think I’m getting too many tally marks in a row. They will be hard to count. How can I make the marks easier to count? (dignify all student answers) Other people have found it hard to count lines and lines of tally marks too. This is what they came up with, and we will use this idea in class. (demonstrate a set with the fifth mark crossed over)

    “How many marks do we put down before we cross? How many in all? Now if we have lots of tally marks, we can count most of them by 5s” (Continue the game throughout the book. When finished, count the tally marks by 5s)

    “We have 2 left over. How shall we count them? (dignify answers) Let’s recount the groups – 5, 10, 15 – one more than 15 is 16 and one more than 16 is 17. So we have 17 tally marks, one for each spider. Tally marks make it easier to keep track when you count.”

    Closure:

    “You have been great spider spies today. You found 17 spiders.”

    Guided Practice:

    Pass out a piece of scratch paper to each student. Ask, “How do I make a tally mark? (demonstrate) Now make one on your paper.” Put four dots on the board. Say, “Make a tally mark for each dot (demonstrate). Add one more dot. Say, "Where will you put the next tally mark? Make the next tally mark on your paper while I make one on the board."


    Evaluation:

    Put a set of tally marks on the board. Ask the students what they are called. Ask the students to make a tally mark in the air.

    Extension:

    Create a Center
    Materials: Laminated construction paper strips with varying quantities of dots, Dry erase pens
    Procedure: Put sets of dots on construction paper and laminate. Ask students to make corresponding tally marks on the strips by varying the quantity of dots.

    Follow-Up

    Graphing with Edith Ellen Eddy lesson plan


    Math - Problem Solving : Tallying with Edith Ellen Eddy

    Teacher Name: ____________________________________

    Student Name:     ________________________________________

    CATEGORY
    4
    3
    2
    1
    Mathematical Concepts
    Explanation shows complete understanding of the mathematical concepts used to solve the problem(s).
    Explanation shows substantial understanding of the mathematical concepts used to solve the problem(s).
    Explanation shows some understanding of the mathematical concepts needed to solve the problem(s).
    Explanation shows very limited understanding of the underlying concepts needed to solve the problem(s) OR is not written.
    Working with Others
    Student was an engaged partner, listening to suggestions of others and working cooperatively throughout lesson.
    Student was an engaged partner but had trouble listening to others and/or working cooperatively.
    Student cooperated with others, but needed prompting to stay on-task.
    Student did not work effectively with others.

    For additional information contact :
    Julee Granger
    Merriam Elementary
    KANSAS
    913-992-3600
    EMAIL:
    edithellen@hotmail.com

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